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Vicodin Abuse

It is quite easy to fall prey to vicodin abuse or to a medication close to its kind. Physicians prescribe Vicodin to treat moderate to severe pain, and the fact that many individuals will need to see physician for this issue makes them susceptible to the abuse of vicodin. As a result, it is very easy for patients to begin abusing vicodin for non-medical reasons.

An individual abusing vicodin will generally display certain symptoms indicating that they are on the road to vicodin abuse, or that they may be addicted to vicodin. To know if someone is abusing vicodin, you must know what to look for. They may stash the pills, hide it, place them in several locations, or act sneaky about how many pills they have remaining; they become very protective of the pills. They also have a tendency to get the pills from multiple sources, such employing “doctor hopping” tactics. Some individuals suffering from vicodin abuse will resort to obtaining the pills illegally, such as buying them off the street or from a friend instead of going through their physician. If they abusing vicodin, they may keep running out of their prescription early, way ahead of time.

If a loved one has been abusing vicodin and have decided they need help, start your intervention by picking up the phone and getting the necessary information to obtain that assistance. Find out if you can get the abuser into a local drug rehab, and how he can receive funding for this type of treatment. Most likely, the extent of vicodin abuse will call for specialty treatment and drug detox, which are expensive, therefore, you will have to call around and do your research.

In some situations, there are individuals who have a genuine desire to get clean but refrain from seeking treatment because they do not have the money, insurance, and do not qualify for funding through the government. However, unless you call around and do your research, you will not know if this is the case with your loved one who is suffering from vicodin abuse. It is recommended that you make the effort to get the help your loved one needs.

As with any drug abuse, the abuser must have a sincere desire to get clean in order to stand a chance of getting clean. No matter how hard loved ones may try or how helpful the treatment facilities may be, if the abuser is not ready to get sober, it will not happen. She must become completely disgusted with the way she has been living her life, and must be willing to initiate the change necessary to attain a healthier lifestyle.

If you are unsure of where to seek help, the best place to start is by contacting the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) website. They have several publicly funded organizations that are designed to help in matters of abuse and addiction. By clicking on their facility locator, and on your state, you or your loved one can be on the road to recovery.